Opens Tomorrow

Harrison Ford plays Branch Rickey.

Know Where You Stand

To create each intriguing scene, Taras identified and photographed locations where the many memorable events took place. Using photo manipulation, he blended the past with the present, bringing the old to the surface with the new.

(via My Modern Met and this isn’t happiness)

Scarfolk Council

scarfolk-wake-up-poster

Scarfolk is a town in North West England that did not progress beyond 1979. Instead, the entire decade of the 1970s loops ad infinitum. Here in Scarfolk, pagan rituals blend seamlessly with science; hauntology is a compulsory subject at school, and everyone must be in bed by 8pm because they are perpetually running a slight fever. “Visit Scarfolk today. Our number one priority is keeping rabies at bay.” For more information please reread.

A new hit song by Jimi Hendrix

Jimi Hendrix and Buddy Miles

Feeling constrained by the limitations of the Jimi Hendrix Experience trio (which included drummer Mitch Mitchell and bassist Noel Redding), the guitarist had already started working with an eclectic group of musicians.

They included the Buffalo Springfield’s Stephen Stills, drummer Buddy Miles, saxophonist Lonnie Youngblood and bassist Billy Cox, with whom Hendrix had served in the U.S. military.

The resulting sessions, culled from 1968 and 1969, form the basis of “People, Hell and Angels,” co-produced by Janie Hendrix, original engineer and mixer Eddie Kramer and long-time Hendrix historian John McDermott.  (via Reuters)

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Mrs. Herschel Parker

mrsherschelparker

Bain News Service, publisher. Mrs. Herschel Parker. From the Bain Collection, Library of Congress Prints and Photographs Division.

Mr. Parker (Herschel Clifford Parker) was a Columbia physics professor and a founding member of the Explorers Club. In the spring of 1911 he married Evelyn Naegele. They honeymooned in Alaska.

Mrs. Herschel Parker last saw Professor Parker in 1919. In 1925 she petitioned a Brooklyn court to grant a divorce, citing abandonment and failure to support.

According to Mrs. Herschel Parker, the professor had said, “I am tired of looking after a wife and family. A man with my genius owes himself to mankind in general and cannot be tied down by family routine.”

Finding Vivian Maier

vivian-maier

Over time it became clear the photos belonged to a Chicago nanny named Vivian Maier who had photographed prolifically for nearly 40 years, but who never shared her work during her lifetime.

(be sure to view the movie trailer)

(via Colossal)

101 Shockingly Sexist Vintage Ads

sexist-vintage-ads

(via TheVine)

The modern take? Selling vagina insecurity.

(via Daily Life)

Inspiration for My Papal Archival Hat

Speculum_Sophicum_Rhodostauroticum

As we await artist Tom Sale‘s election to the papacy as Pope Pinky I, the design for my Papal Archivist’s hat proceeds apace. This image, courtesy of friend Ian, offers the inspiration and foundation for my papal archival hat.

A kind of cylindrical Advent calendar is what I envision.

As archivist to Pope Pinky I, I vow to stress style over substance.

Plastic sneeuwstormbeschermer

snow protection

Plastic face protection from snowstorms. Canada, Montreal, 1939. (Nationaal Archief of the Netherlands. Spaarnestad Photo. Het Leven.)

“Modernism provides face protection from snowstorms.” (@alienated)

In remembrance: Charlotte Bradshaw’s autograph book

My occasional annual Armistice Day commemoration.

Charlotte Bradshaw (1893-1920) was my great grandfather’s sister or put another way, my grandmother’s aunt. She was a nurse in Bradford during the first World War and had an autograph book, most of the entries were collected at the end of 1916 and the start of 1917. After the war she traveled to Australia on account of having weak lungs, she got homesick there and returned to England where she died of TB. There are a few entries here from that return journey. My father, Jim, recently had Charlotte’s autograph book scanned and we have worked together to make this website to commemorate her and the soldiers she treated.

Eel Weir, taken from Town Bridge in Athlone, County Westmeath

I’m a little afraid of eels and am at a loss why I should find this photograph of an eel weir at Athlone, Westmeath, Ireland (circa 1900) evocative in an appealing way.

If you do not know what an eel weir is, you can read an article about one in the Catskills on the East Branch of the Delaware River.

The Grateful Dead Archive Online is now officially open

The Grateful Dead Archive Online (GDAO) is a socially constructed collection comprised of over 45,000 digitized items drawn from the UCSC [University of California at Santa Cruz] Library’s extensive Grateful Dead Archive (GDA) and from digital content submitted by the community and global network of Grateful Dead fans.

From The Advocate Archives: 1969 Article on the Stonewall Riots

June 28 and 29 mark the anniversary of the Stonewall riot, a 1969 event many recognize as central to the gay rights movement of the 1970s and beyond. Editors researching The Advocate archives for the magazine’s forty-fifth anniversary issue came across a piece that appeared in September 1969, reprinted from a summer newsletter of the New York Mattachine Society.

Titled Police Raid on N.Y. Club Sets Off First Gay Riot:

Plainclothes officers entered the [Stonewall Inn] at about 2 a.m., armed with a warrant, and closed the place on grounds of illegal selling of alcohol. Employees were arrested and the customers told to leave. The patrons gathered on the street outside and were joined by other Village residents and visitors to the area.

The police behaved, as is usually the case when they deal with homosexuals, with bad grace, and were reproached by “straight” onlookers. Pennies were thrown at the cops by the crowd, then beer cans, rocks, and even parking meters. The cops retreated inside the bar, which was set afire by the crowd.

The United Typothetae of America (and Its Future)

“Hell is empty and all the devils are here.”

They were what you might call a guild of master printers.

On September 27, 1900, they pondered their future and they et. They started off with Blue Points, a splash of sherry, something called Essence of White Sage Hen, olives, salted almonds, and celery. Then turbans of black bass, sliced cucumbers, and potatoes marquises. And/or diamondback terrapin (in case). And/or lamp chops with asparagus tips. (And Parisian potatoes!) Washed down with various 1884 Sauternes.

There was an interval of sherbet crème de menthe (to cleanse the palate?) and cigarettes, followed by roast stuffed quail (imperiale) with corn cake and guava jelly. Plus lettuce and tomato, filled with celery and mayonnaise. A gulp or so of Moët & Chandon.

Ice cream (en surprise) and assorted cakes for afters. A cheese course of Roquefort cheese and “saline wafers.” And a wee nip of Chartreuse. Topped off by café noir and cigars.

(From the wonderful NYPL Menu Collection.)

Artists’ protest letter to James Johnson Sweeney, New York, N.Y., 1956

In honor of Frank Lloyd Wright’s birthday: a 1956 artists’ letter of protest against his design for the Guggenheim Museum, which “indicates a callous disregard for the fundamental rectilinear frame of reference necessary for the adequate visual contemplation of works of art.”

Petaluma Chicken Promotional Film (1932)

Promotional film for Sonoma County poultry industry. Featuring young women making an extremely large omelet.

“Gee, I bet yours tastes the best!”

À propos storytelling and reportage

Turns out that 2012 marks the centenary of the birth of Studs Terkel and that a retrospective of film, video and documentary programming spanning his television career will be among the highlights of a yearlong Chicago salute.

Of special interest to the media community will be the Studs Terkel Video and Film Festival, described by curator Tom Weinberg as “a free series of breakthrough events for people of all ages to see and enjoy both the remarkable man and his role as a TV pioneer.” Confirmed dates include June 2 at the Chicago History Museum and June 17 at the Claudia Cassidy Theater in the Chicago Cultural Center.

Weinberg, who was a close friend of Terkel and founder of the Media Burn Independent Video Archive, said the festival will include screenings of seven episodes of the landmark series Studs’ Place that have not been seen since 1951. Sixteen-millimeter kinescopes were discovered earlier this year in the basement of the Uptown home Terkel shared with his wife Ida, who died in 1999.

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Scene from an imaginary video work

in the manner of William Eggleston’s Stranded in Canton.

UPDATE: The link right above will take you to an hour-plus edit of “Stranded in Canton.” An Eggleston voice-over accompanies.

Historic Tale Construction Kit Recreated

A recreation in HTML and JavaScript of Historic Tale Construction Kit, a now-defunct Flash application.

There’s a description of the original (ein Authoring Tool basierend auf dem Teppich von Bayeux); it’s auf Deutsch.

Fat Man’s Misery

“I’d like a Fat Man’s Misery, easy on the mayo, and a glass of buttermilk. The little lady here will have the Ruins of Karnak and a cup of Postum.”

From the menu of the Mammoth Cave Hotel. (NYPL Restaurant Menu Collection.)

tweet of the day

Chicago Screenshots

Chicago Screenshots is a (slowly growing) collection of Chicago-centric movie and television stills, presented as architectural and urban landscape photography.

Funk songs from Vietnam GIs

If you didn’t get a Christmas present from me, it’s because I’m waiting till the New Year to buy you East of Underground: Hell Below. (Thanks to Valerie for the tip.)

In 1971 the US was pulling troops out of Vietnam, and its bases in Germany were full of draftees at a loose end. “You were painting shovels, picking up cigarette butts – it was a lot of busy-work,” remembers former serviceman Lewis Hitt. “There was a longing by everyone, especially the draftees, to get home and go back to what you were doing before.”

This was the crucible in which were formed scores of raucous funk bands made up of servicemen, four of which have just been compiled by Now-Again Records. Adoring crowd noise was crudely dubbed on top of their records, which were then distributed in recruitment centres. These bands were used by the army to present service as varied, even hip. But the songs they cover – the bitter, suspicious likes of Backstabbers and Smiling Faces Sometimes – undermine any potential propagandising.

The Struggle for the Occupy Wall Street Archives

I thought at first that this long article by Michelle Dean might strike most of y’all as Too Much Archives, which is to say too much shop talk and too narrow in its focus. More than you really want to read about the issues archivists face.

Then again, maybe not. Maybe this will draw you in.
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Phonograms

Patrick Feaster studies the culture of early phonography (the recording and reproduction of sound) and blogs at Phonozoic, where I’ve been hanging out for the past hour or so. At the 2011 conference of the Association for Recorded Sound Collections, Feaster shared “Phonogram Images on Paper: 1250-1950.” You can listen to his presentation and download slides here. Just scroll down a little ways and you’ll find the links.

(via Excavated Shellac)

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