quote out of context

Know Where You Stand

To create each intriguing scene, Taras identified and photographed locations where the many memorable events took place. Using photo manipulation, he blended the past with the present, bringing the old to the surface with the new.

(via My Modern Met and this isn’t happiness)

Soviet Ghost Town in the Czech Republic

Bozi Dar Soviet Base in Czechoslovakia, Arch

In 1992, Russia generously gave the already crumbling buildings and polluted, explosive-riddled land to the Czech government, claiming that the value of this piece of real estate would make up for the cost of cleaning it. It seems the Czechs had little choice but to accept.

Read more

Rory Gallagher: Cradle Rock

Cradle Rock (Montreux 1975)

This was on my mind today, although I’m not sure what made it jump out of my memory.

One of the most influential guitarists of the Seventies, Irish-born Rory Gallagher passed away at the age of 47 in 1995, of complications from a liver transplant. Although he remains relatively unknown, Gallagher is remembered by a devoted fan base, and listed as an inspiration by other, more famous guitar heroes.

Read more

Miss Sausage Queen

Miss Sausage Queen 1955

(via Retronaut)

Morions for the Millions

morion

Morions for the Millions is a Facebook group “dedicated to the reintroduction of the 17th century comb morion helmet as an article of everyday wear.”

I have already learned through a post to this group that a mix of old and new morions may be found within the Militaria offered on eBay, and I am reviewing the options.

A new hit song by Jimi Hendrix

Jimi Hendrix and Buddy Miles

Feeling constrained by the limitations of the Jimi Hendrix Experience trio (which included drummer Mitch Mitchell and bassist Noel Redding), the guitarist had already started working with an eclectic group of musicians.

They included the Buffalo Springfield’s Stephen Stills, drummer Buddy Miles, saxophonist Lonnie Youngblood and bassist Billy Cox, with whom Hendrix had served in the U.S. military.

The resulting sessions, culled from 1968 and 1969, form the basis of “People, Hell and Angels,” co-produced by Janie Hendrix, original engineer and mixer Eddie Kramer and long-time Hendrix historian John McDermott.  (via Reuters)

Read more

Herero People of Namibia

Herero woman in blue dress

I could do without the Daily Mail‘s screaming headline (AMAZING African tribe!), as well as the article’s potted Explanation from Anthropological Experts, but the Herero people in Jim Naughton’s National Geographic-style portraits are possessed of a beauty that I found humbling.

See the world without leaving China

The Window of the World is a theme park located in the western part of the city of Shenzhen in the People’s Republic of China. It has about 130 reproductions of some of the most famous tourist attractions in the world squeezed into 48 hectares (118 acres). The 108 metre (354 ft) tall Eiffel Tower dominates the skyline and the sight of the Pyramids and the Taj Mahal all in proximity to each other are all part of the appeal of this theme park.

(via Wikipedia)

Read more

Mrs. Herschel Parker

mrsherschelparker

Bain News Service, publisher. Mrs. Herschel Parker. From the Bain Collection, Library of Congress Prints and Photographs Division.

Mr. Parker (Herschel Clifford Parker) was a Columbia physics professor and a founding member of the Explorers Club. In the spring of 1911 he married Evelyn Naegele. They honeymooned in Alaska.

Mrs. Herschel Parker last saw Professor Parker in 1919. In 1925 she petitioned a Brooklyn court to grant a divorce, citing abandonment and failure to support.

According to Mrs. Herschel Parker, the professor had said, “I am tired of looking after a wife and family. A man with my genius owes himself to mankind in general and cannot be tied down by family routine.”

Finding Vivian Maier

vivian-maier

Over time it became clear the photos belonged to a Chicago nanny named Vivian Maier who had photographed prolifically for nearly 40 years, but who never shared her work during her lifetime.

(be sure to view the movie trailer)

(via Colossal)

Headline of the day

New cunning linguist computer has got ancient tongues licked

Inspiration for My Papal Archival Hat

Speculum_Sophicum_Rhodostauroticum

As we await artist Tom Sale‘s election to the papacy as Pope Pinky I, the design for my Papal Archivist’s hat proceeds apace. This image, courtesy of friend Ian, offers the inspiration and foundation for my papal archival hat.

A kind of cylindrical Advent calendar is what I envision.

As archivist to Pope Pinky I, I vow to stress style over substance.

Post-Game Analysis

Baltimore is cool, like, because of John Waters and all. And Randy Newman’s song.

Also, ravens are way cool. I never met a corvid I didn’t like.

They’re clever. And they play in the snow.

Plus, The Ravens was the name The Kinks had before they were The Kinks.

“Titanic” scene from “The Unsinkable Molly Brown”

Debbie Reynolds. Spunky. Feisty.

Leonard Smith

Leonard_Smith_MED

My grandfather, who passed away before I was born in the late Fifties, is the subject of these passages from my father’s recollection of our family history:

I’m sure you already know that Grandpa Smith traveled the RKO Keith vaudeville circuit during the 1920’s as part of a Hawaiian music troupe featuring his then wife Princess and her supposed brother, Willie. Dad was a sideman, providing ukulele rhythm accompaniment for the act.  Back in the day, he was a petty decent uke player. He developed a stroke that was unique in that it infallibly controlled the tempo during a song. He helped cement the musical sound of the entire group. The several times I heard him play were long after he’d lost most of his chops. It was obvious, however, that at one time he was certainly quite good. Read more

She’s not there (She’s still here)

From a letter penned in 1993 by my friend Lee, who can now scarcely find words at all.

Steve & I saw Indochine last night. Horrors! I’ve lost the ability to sit still that long even for La Deneuve. When I left the movie I was saying to Steve that it was remarkable how they handled the time in the movie and this blah blah metaphor for the blah blah relationship between France and Indochina and how leaving the Japs out compressed the blah blah and effectively blah blah. This morning I woke up still thinking about it — or seeing it, really — and there on the screen of my mind was the word SONY. No wonder they left out the Greater East Asia Co-Prosperity Sphere. Well, I loved it anyway. A French Gone with the Wind. [April 1993]

The Indian Head Test Pattern

The “Indian head” test pattern has mystified you for decades, right? Here’s the story: “a concise history of the RCA Indian Head Test Pattern as an icon of engineering in the early American television industry, and the providential story behind its rediscovery and restoration.”

Trouble is, it doesn’t solve the mystery: Why the head of an “Indian chief”?

Ivor Cutler: I’m Going in a Field

A scene deleted from the Beatles’ Magical Mystery Tour. Mr. Cutler in his role as Buster Bloodvessel, performing the song “I’m Going in a Field,” which appears on the 1967 LP Ludo, produced by George Martin.

Thanks to Patrick Widdess for including this clip in his recent appreciation of Ivor Cutler.

The Silent Flute by Bruce Lee

Miracle Jones, the pearl of Texas, tosses a Bruce Lee poem to the youtube gods…

Strange


Strange to think that if Emmett Till had lived, he’d be seventy-one this day.

I met his mother once.

Break It Down

Teju Cole’s New Inquiry piece on the destruction of Sufi shrines in Timbuktu is the most thoughtful I’ve read on these disturbing events.

There is in iconoclasm an emotional content that is directly linked to the iconoclasts’ own psychology. The theological pretext for image destruction is that images are powerless, less than God, uneffective as a source of succour, and therefore disposable. But in reality, iconoclasm is motivated by the iconoclast’s profound belief in the power of the image being destroyed. The love iconoclasts have for icons is a love that dare not speak its name.

Sex is best when you lose your head

In the past thirty years, the conventional wisdom has been destroyed. The truth is that females of most species actively seek multiple partners to have sex with. If the aim of males is to put their sperm into as many females as possible, females are trying, with equal determination, to get the very best sperm to fertilise their eggs – even if that means having sex with many males in turn.

The Grateful Dead Archive Online is now officially open

The Grateful Dead Archive Online (GDAO) is a socially constructed collection comprised of over 45,000 digitized items drawn from the UCSC [University of California at Santa Cruz] Library’s extensive Grateful Dead Archive (GDA) and from digital content submitted by the community and global network of Grateful Dead fans.

From The Advocate Archives: 1969 Article on the Stonewall Riots

June 28 and 29 mark the anniversary of the Stonewall riot, a 1969 event many recognize as central to the gay rights movement of the 1970s and beyond. Editors researching The Advocate archives for the magazine’s forty-fifth anniversary issue came across a piece that appeared in September 1969, reprinted from a summer newsletter of the New York Mattachine Society.

Titled Police Raid on N.Y. Club Sets Off First Gay Riot:

Plainclothes officers entered the [Stonewall Inn] at about 2 a.m., armed with a warrant, and closed the place on grounds of illegal selling of alcohol. Employees were arrested and the customers told to leave. The patrons gathered on the street outside and were joined by other Village residents and visitors to the area.

The police behaved, as is usually the case when they deal with homosexuals, with bad grace, and were reproached by “straight” onlookers. Pennies were thrown at the cops by the crowd, then beer cans, rocks, and even parking meters. The cops retreated inside the bar, which was set afire by the crowd.

Next Page »