Project Nim

From the director of Man on Wire, Project Nim:

Tells the story of a chimpanzee taken from its mother at birth and raised like a human child by a family in a brownstone on the upper West Side in the 1970s.

(via marginal revolution)

Hipsemantic Oratory from Lord Buckley

in recognition of the Ides of March.

(Cf. Willie the Shake. Julius Caesar. Act 3, Scene ii. Lines 74-108)

Hipsters, flipsters, and finger-poppin’ daddies
Knock me your lobes
I came to lay Caesar out
Not to hip you to him
The bad jazz that a cat blows
Wails long after he’s cut out.

smoke signals

from the comments

Carole Corlew:

War correspondent Marie Colvin was a swashbuckler long before the black eyepatch. She performed daring feats for a living, then partied like a rockstar. She collected men easily and left them behind. A woman told me once that the French people in the Paris bureau could not understand Marie, “in French or English. Because of the New Jersey accent.” The remark puzzled me. Marie did not have an accent. She was a fast talker, and in the days before she contributed broadcast reports was something of a mumbler. I know now she was in a hurry. She had only a few years and was rushing toward her fate.

In fact, the story goes that when chided about her smoking habit, she insisted tobacco would not be the thing that got her in the end.


Lou Carr predicted Marie wouldn’t last as a foreign correspondent. He said she would end up back in Oyster Bay, married and driving around a station wagon loaded with kids. He was wrong. But maybe that’s where Marie is headed, across the way, with the 2-year-old boy whose so quiet death broke her heart a few hours before she joined him.

tweet of the day

from the comments

Rick Neece:

I’m also picturing one of those pet-toys where the big, battery-driven head rolls erratically over the floor with the little, empty skin of a body flipping and flapping around, following along behind it.

from the comments

Joel Bernstein:

All our accents derive from Britain.

Owlet Caterpillars of Eastern North America

My same friend Susan who brought us the critically acclaimed Omega Institute in Your Pants, 2010 edition today supplied the following list, from the book Owlet Caterpillars of Eastern North America by David L. Wagner, Dale F. Schweitzer, J. Bolling Sullivan, and Richard C. Reardon:

Sordid Snout
The Herald
Feeble Grass Moth
Dead-wood Borer
The Betrothed
The Little Wife
Serene Underwing
The Consort
Dejected Underwing
Inconsolable Underwing
Tearful Underwing
Sad Underwing
The Penitent
Sappho Underwing
Youthful Underwing
Darling Underwing
Read more

tweet of the day

dear clusterflock

What are other words like this?

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