Category Archives: the future

Tigie Lancaster of Marfa


Photograph by Allison V. Smith.

Here’s something that’ll tell you a little bit about who Tigie was — plus a little bit more on Tigie before she moved to Marfa.

I held off on posting this till one of us could sit face-to-face with our friend Lee and tell her that her friend Tigie had died. It was Steve who finally broke the news to Lee.

I never did meet Tigie, but I knew who she was starting from when I was nineteen or so, when I still lived in Dallas, which is where I met Lee. I was hoping that once Lee moved back to Dallas she and I could revisit Marfa (we went there in 2006) and I could meet Tigie.

Well, nothing to stop our going back to Marfa.

The Sad Allure of The Vermont Country Store

For me, browsing the offerings of The Vermont Country Store is a little like clearing out the house of an elderly relative who’s died.

Tender sentiments and pity mingle with embarrassment and faint revulsion.
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The United Typothetae of America (and Its Future)

“Hell is empty and all the devils are here.”

They were what you might call a guild of master printers.

On September 27, 1900, they pondered their future and they et. They started off with Blue Points, a splash of sherry, something called Essence of White Sage Hen, olives, salted almonds, and celery. Then turbans of black bass, sliced cucumbers, and potatoes marquises. And/or diamondback terrapin (in case). And/or lamp chops with asparagus tips. (And Parisian potatoes!) Washed down with various 1884 Sauternes.

There was an interval of sherbet crème de menthe (to cleanse the palate?) and cigarettes, followed by roast stuffed quail (imperiale) with corn cake and guava jelly. Plus lettuce and tomato, filled with celery and mayonnaise. A gulp or so of Moët & Chandon.

Ice cream (en surprise) and assorted cakes for afters. A cheese course of Roquefort cheese and “saline wafers.” And a wee nip of Chartreuse. Topped off by café noir and cigars.

(From the wonderful NYPL Menu Collection.)

Sally Cruikshank: “Make Me Psychic” (1978)

What got me started was the discovery that animation artist Sally Cruikshank has an Etsy shop where she’s selling watercolors.

Cruikshank is probably best known for Quasi at the Quackadero (1975), which is now listed on the United States National Film Registry. Or you may have seen the animated sequences she contributed to Sesame Street in the nineties.

My favorite, though, has always been Make Me Psychic. “Which way to the we-fwesh-ments?”

(Many of Cruikshank’s films are available for viewing on her YouTube channel, laughingsal, as well as on a DVD you can buy from her Etsy shop.)

Futurama

My mother was one of the many who visited the 1939 World’s Fair in New York. I asked her once about the Futurama, a kind of ride into the future twenty years hence.

“You rode the Futurama?” I asked her.

“Yes. Of course.”

“Wow! What was it like?”

[Dismissively.] “Oh, we just sat in little cars that we didn’t drive. We rode around on tracks and looked at the future.”

California may legalize driverless cars.

How do blogs need to evolve?

Anil Dash, Meg Hourihan, Matt Haughey, Paul Bausch, and Evan Williams discuss How do blogs need to evolve?

Anil begins the conversation with:

It seems like some of the basic elements of the form, such as comments, have been stuck in a model that doesn’t work very well to encourage quality responses and also doesn’t fit the way people do things socially online these days. Oddly, a blog comment isn’t even as good a social object as a photo.